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Nanosecond Fluorescence Lifetime Standards

We offer a range of nanosecond Fluorescence Lifetime Standards, covering the UV to Visible spectral region. Our lifetime standards have been conveniently packaged into vials, which when reconstituted by adding solvent, can readily be used. We also offer a Fluorescence Lifetime Standard Kit, which contains all five lifetime probes; simply add solvent and measure.

Standard tau / ns Solvent Ex / nm Em / nm Reference
 p-Terphenyl  1.06  EtOH  295 350 1
 PPD  1.25  EtOH  282 350 1
 POPOP  1.29  EtOH  295 400 1
2-Aminpurine  12.0  Water  295 380 1
Fluorescein, dianion  4.16  Water, pH10  444 500 2,3

References:

1. J.R. Lakowicz, Principles of Fluorescence Spectroscopy, 2nd Ed., Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, London, Moscow, Dordrecht, 1999.

2. D. Magde, G.E. Rojas, and P. Seybold, Solvent Dependence of the Fluorescence Lifetimes of Xanthene Dyes, Photochem. Photobiol. 70, 737, 1999.

3. B. Valeur, M.N. Berberan-Santos, Molecular Fluorescence: Principles and Applications, 2nd ed., Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2012.

 

1. p-Terphenyl [1.06 ns]

absorption spectra and contour emission graph for p-Terphenyl dissolved in air equilibrated ethanol

Figure 1. (A) Absorption spectra recorded for p-Terphenyl dissolved in ethanol. The chemical structure of p-Terphenyl is shown in the insert. (B) Contour emission graph recorded for the sample presented in panel A.

 
Emission spectra and time resolved decay recorded for p-Terphenyl dissolved in air equilibrated ethanol

Figure 2. (A) Normalized emission spectra recorded for p-Terphenyl dissolved in air equilibrated ethanol. The excitation wavelength was 295 nm. (B) Time-resolved decay recorded for sample presented in panel A. The excitation wavelength was 295 nm and the emission collected through a monochromator centered at 350 nm. The data fits well to a monoexponential decay function with a fluorescence lifetime of 1.06 ns. The channel width was 6.96 ps/ch. The weighted residuals are shown in the upper panel.

 

2. 2,5-Diphenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PPD) [1.25 ns]

absorption spectra and contour emission graph for PPO dissolved in air equilibrated ethanol

Figure 3. (A) Absorption spectra recorded for 2,5-Diphenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PPO) dissolved in ethanol. The chemical structure of PPO is shown in the insert. (B) Contour emission graph recorded for the sample presented in panel A.

 
Emission spectra and time resolved decay recorded for p-Terphenyl dissolved in air equilibrated ethanol

Figure 4. (A) Normalized emission spectra recorded for PPO dissolved in ethanol. The excitation wavelength was 282 nm. (B) Time-resolved decay recorded for sample presented in panel A, the excitation wavelength was 282 nm and the emission collected through a monochromator centered at 350 nm. The data fits well to a monoexponential decay function with a fluorescence lifetime of 1.25 ns. The channel width was 6.96 ps/ch. The weighted residuals are shown in the upper panel.

 

3. 1,4-bis(5-phenyloxazol-2-yl) benzene (POPOP) [1.29 ns]

absorption spectra and contour emission graph for PPO dissolved in air equilibrated ethanol

Figure 5. (A) Absorption spectra recorded for POPOP dissolved in ethanol. The chemical structure of POPOP is shown in the insert. (B) Contour emission graph recorded for the sample presented in panel A.

 
Emission spectra and time resolved decay recorded for p-Terphenyl dissolved in air equilibrated ethanol

Figure 6. (A) Normalized emission spectra recorded for POPOP dissolved in ethanol. The excitation wavelength was 295 nm. (B) Time-resolved decay recorded for sample presented in panel A, the excitation wavelength was 295 nm and the emission collected through a monochromator centered at 400 nm. The data fits well to a monoexponential decay function with a fluorescence lifetime of 1.29 ns. The channel width was 6.96 ps/ch. The weighted residuals are shown in the upper panel.

 

4. 2-Aminopurine [12.0 ns]

absorption spectra and contour emission graph for 1 Aminpurine dissolved in air equilibrated water

Figure 7. (A) Absorption spectra recorded for 2-Aminopurine dissolved in water. The chemical structure of 2-Aminopurine is shown in the insert. (B) Contour emission graph recorded for the sample presented in panel A.

 
Emission spectra and time resolved decay recorded for 2 aminopurine dissolved in air equilibrated water

Figure 8. (A) Normalized emission spectra recorded for 2-Amino Purine dissolved in water. The excitation wavelength was 295 nm. (B) Time-resolved decay recorded for sample presented in panel A, the excitation wavelength was 295 nm and the emission collected through a monochromator centered at 380 nm. The data fits well to a monoexponential decay function with a fluorescence lifetime of 12.0 ns. The channel width was 13.92 ps/ch. The weighted residuals are shown in the upper panel.

 

5. Fluorescein, dianion [4.16 ns]

absorption spectra and contour emission graph for Fluorescein dissolved in air equilibrated water

Figure 9. (A) Absorption spectra recorded for Fluorescein, dianion dissolved in water at pH 10. (B) Contour emission graph recorded for the sample presented in panel A.

 
Emission spectra and time resolved decay recorded for fluorescein dissolved in air equilibrated water at pH 10

Figure 10. (A) Normalized emission spectra recorded for fluorescein dissolved in water at pH 10. The excitation wavelength was 444 nm. (B) Time-resolved decay recorded for sample presented in panel A, the excitation wavelength was 444 nm and the emission collected through a monochromator centered at 500 nm. The data fits well to a monoexponential decay with a fluorescence lifetime of 4.16 ns. The channel width was 6.96 ps/ch. The weighted residuals are shown in the upper panel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

LifeTimeStndv4

Chemical structures of Nanosecond Fluorescence Lifetime Standards.