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Contrived Diabetic Tears

Contrived Diabetic Tears (artificial tears) for your every need.

Similar to our regular Contrived Tears, our Contrived Diabetic Tears have been developed from > 15 components known to be present in tears, balancing protein, salt and pH alike, in line with accepted tear formulations and tear Glucose levels. Our Contrived Diabetic Tears are a low cost solution to your diagnostic testing and instrument calibration needs and are sold in 5, 10 and 20 ml volumes. The Tear Osmolarity of our normal subject (fasting glucose) tears is 300 mOsms/L with a pH of 7.4 and glucose concentration of 0.2 mmol/L (200 µM).

Our Contrived Diabetic Tear Kit (artificial tears), features 6 vials with differing Glucose levels. Our Contrived Diabetic Tears have been developed from > 15 components known to be present in tears, balancing protein, salt and pH alike, in line with accepted tear formulations and tear Glucose levels.1-9 Our Contrived Diabetic Tears Kit offers the same tear formulation as our standard tears (osmolarity - 300 mOsms/L), but with varying Glucose levels, reflecting both normal subject, 0.2 mmol/L (200 µM) Glucose and the higher levels of glucose known to be present in Diabetic patient tears, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 2.0 mmol/L.  Our Contrived Diabetic Tears are a low cost solution to your diagnostic needs and are sold in 5 ml pre-made volumes of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 2.0 mmol/L Glucose and 300 mOsms/L salt / protein, pH 7.4. Larger volumes are available on special request to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

For researchers wishing to quantitate Tear Glucose levels, we offer a range of Fluorescent Probes which readily chelate Glucose over the Tear-Glucose Diabetic Range. See our Glucose Probe Technology

All Ursa BioScience™ tear products are intended for research use only and are not intended for human or animal use.

 

References

[1] Sen, D.K. and G.S. Sarin, Tear glucose levels in normal people and in diabetic patients. British Journal of Ophthalmology, 1980. 64(9): p. 693-695.

[2] Chu, M.X., et al., Soft contact lens biosensor for in situ monitoring of tear glucose as non-invasive blood sugar assessment. Talanta, 2011. 83(3): p. 960-965.

[3] Yao, H., et al., A contact lens with embedded sensor for monitoring tear glucose level. Biosensors and Bioelectronics, 2011. 26(7): p. 3290-3296.

[4] Sagdik, H.M., et al., Tear Film Osmolarity in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus. Ophthalmic Research, 2013. 50(1): p. 1-5.

[5] Peng, B., et al., Evaluation of enzyme-based tear glucose electrochemical sensors over a wide range of blood glucose concentrations. Biosensors and Bioelectronics, 2013. 49(0): p. 204-209.

[6] Iguchi, S., et al., A flexible and wearable biosensor for tear glucose measurement. Biomedical Microdevices, 2007. 9(4): p. 603-609.

[7] Badugu, R., J.R. Lakowicz, and C.D. Geddes, A glucose-sensing contact lens: from bench top to patient. Current Opinion in Biotechnology, 2005. 16(1): p. 100-107.

[8] Badugu, R., J.R. Lakowicz, and C.D. Geddes, Ophthalmic glucose sensing: a novel monosaccharide sensing disposable and colorless contact lens. Analyst, 2004. 129(6): p. 516-521.

[9] Badugu, R., J.R. Lakowicz, and C.D. Geddes, Noninvasive continuous monitoring of physiological glucose using a monosaccharide-sensing contact lens. Analytical Chemistry, 2004. 76(3): p. 610-618.

 

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